Tag: blogging

Foodie Bloggers

March 15th, 2007   •   8 comments   

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This post is dedicated to my friends who bake, cook, prepare cocktails and generally help to make life sweeter and more sublime for foodies and drinkers like myself.

Being a true-blue Singaporean, I love to have my carrot cake and eat it. Yes, we are a nation of foodies and many people live and swear by their hokkien mee, satays, roti pratas, and mee poks (a flat fettucine like egg noodle) here. There are also many food guides around (many with online counterparts) like the venerable Makansutra which has become a national institution for many here.
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Why Bosses Should Blog

March 6th, 2007   •   13 comments   


Jonathan Schwartz , CEO of Sun Microsystems and avid blogger

This post resulted from a series of email exchanges between Ivan Chew, Kevin Lim and a couple of other media socialists. The basic idea is whether it makes sense for people in positions of authority to blog, and if so, what benefits or drawbacks do they bring.

As a publicist, I have been involved in profling both my organisations and CEOs for the longest time. People are always interested to hear from the top dogs. This includes usual stuff like their vision, key thrusts, 5-year plans, ideas to revolutionise the industry, management style, to more personal details like favourite food, hobbies etc. They can also change an organisation’s course for the future. This can apply to something as macro as a country’s destiny, to one as micro as a product line’s bottom-line.
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Creating Good Vibes

March 4th, 2007   •   2 comments   

Recently, I attended a staff seminar where the theme of resonance was used. According to Wikipedia, resonance is a term used in physics whereby one system tends to oscillate a maximum amplitude at certain frequency.

Resonance is a powerful force multiplier. It is both a natural and artificial phenomenon whereby something moves in synchrony with another, for both good and bad. Witness how the powerful high pitched voices of soprano singers can cause wine glasses to shatter.

Marching soldiers crossing a wooden bridge at a certain rhythm can cause it to break. Even helicopters like the almighty Chinook can fall prey to Resonance! Watch this video below:

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Getting Naked on the Blogosphere

January 15th, 2007   •   2 comments   

Want to know how blogging is impacting the world of business? Keen to find know all about the secrets of blogging success while learning about its possible drawbacks? Well, do check out Naked Conversations by Robert Scoble and Shel Israel.

Few in the blogging world are unfamiliar with Robert Scoble, author of the highly popular Scobleizer blog and one of the doyens responsible for giving fame to Microsoft’s Channel 9 News. His incredible number of connections with the “Who’s Who” in the blogging world helped to make this an interesting read.
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Mark Twain The Blogging Guru

December 22nd, 2006   •   no comments   

Came across this quirky bit of thinking by Copyblogger about how the legendary Mark Twain (the artist formerly known as Samuel Langhorne Clemens) will make an excellent blogger and perhaps even content marketing guru!

Try to apply these gems to blogging – heck, any form of content marketing or writing – and you will understand the wisdom of the man.

“Whenever you find you’re on the side of the majority, it is time to reform.”

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The Best Laid Plans of Mice and Men?

November 27th, 2006   •   no comments   

Planning versus execution. There is an age-old debate about which is more important in marketing. Should strategy take precedence over implementation? Similarly, which is of greater significance – the general’s plans or the warriors tactics?

I believe that increasingly, ivory towers “strategic marketing” ain’t gonna cut the ice. Poring over numerous analytical reports and market research alone will not do. AC Nielsen may have the best coverage of traditional marketing channels but have you read what people are talking about you on hardwarezone’s forums? How about what the taxi drivers are saying behind your backs?

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Value through Videos and Virals

November 22nd, 2006   •   no comments   

I came across this fascinating post from Marketing Sherpa about how one can use both blogging and video logs (or vlogs) to generate word-of-mouth interest. While the subject matter is about golfing equipment and apparel, the same principles can be applied across other “experience-rich” businesses. They include sports retail, travel agencies, leisure attractions (especially zoos and theme parks), restaurants, and maybe even museums.

Everyone’s talking about all of the things you can do with online video — and why not? Once production completes and the clips are on your site, it’s essentially a 24/7 downloadable TV commercial.

But the space is becoming more competitive, and marketers will have to find ways to cut through the video clutter sooner rather than later as the medium matures.

See how one golf-club manufacturer used original programming in a blog and in merchandising to build their email database from scratch.

It would be great if Singapore businesses can explore leveraging on the power of youtube, Yahoo! video and other such channels.

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Weapons of Mass Distraction

November 19th, 2006   •   2 comments   

Was emailing to both Ivan Chew and Siva, when the idea for this blog post struck me. After all, in the age of digital democratization, time is probably the most scarce resource. We only have 24 hours a day, and there is only this much you can do.

Here are some modern day Weapons of Mass Distraction:

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From Main Course to Bite-sized to Crumbs

November 16th, 2006   •   1 comment   

With the democratization and increasing portability of information, people’s attention span and capacity for reading has dimished at an astonishing rate. I must admit that I am one of those who suffer from this affliction.

In the past, we used to be able to plough through thick tomes of knowledge, fantasy, religion and whatever else captures our fancy. I could dawdle for hours and hours in libraries, picking up one book after another and devouring it with relish. I especially loved reading encyclopedias, and occasionally, I could read from cover to cover.

Not any more it seems. With the lure of easy information on the web, and the quick availability of bite-sized information on blogs, book summaries, wikipedia, and the like, I have become a scanner rather than a delver. Information now gets delivered to my cranium in small, often miniscule bite-sized pieces, instead of elaborate and complex frameworks.

I believe that I am not alone in this. Many have remarked that youths and teens nowadays tend to multi-task and acquire information from varied sources rather than a singular one. They do not have the stamina or patience to sit in one spot and read line after line. Short cuts, acronyms and abbreviated words seem to be the order of the day.


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