Tag: Book Reviews

The Last Lecture: Book Review

November 10th, 2011   •   1 comment   

“We cannot change the cards we are dealt, just how we play the hand.” – Randy Pausch (RIP 25 July 2008)

I first blogged about Carnegie Mellon Professor Randy Pausch back in 28 July 2008, 3 days after his death from pancreatic cancer. So moved was I by the video of his last lecture (do watch it if you haven’t done so), that I bought the book.  Of course, this was way before the recent death of the more famous Steve Jobs of Apple.

Read More


Lessons from The Monk Who Sold His Ferrari

September 20th, 2011   •   no comments   

Monk Who Sold His Ferrari

Are you tired of running the rat race? Wonder how you can better fulfill your life dreams and live more abundantly?

Part self help book, part fable, The Monk Who Sold His Ferrari by leadership guru Robin Sharma is a slim novel that packed powerful life and leadership lessons.
Read More


Book Review: What the Dog Saw by Malcolm Gladwell

August 20th, 2011   •   no comments   

Malcolm Gladwell has an uncanny talent. Like a detective, he weaves compelling yarns, spinning together sources of information from psychologists, food testers, doctors, animal trainers, criminologists, and other experts to challenge common notions.

With journalistic brilliance honed by his years in the New Yorker, Gladwell proffered radical answers to challenge age-old notions in his latest bestselling volume What the Dog Saw and Other Adventures. A compilation of 19 essays on a wide range of topics – espionage, war, hair colour, kitchen appliances, homelessness and more – the volume blended pop psychology, sociology, management and current affairs in a highly readable prose.
Read More


Book Review: The Pirate’s Dilemma

August 4th, 2011   •   no comments   

Pirate DJ, music buff, and magazine publisher Matt Mason’s book The Pirate’s Dilemma – How Youth Culture is Reinventing Capitalism is a fascinating tour-de-force of the world of youth culture, content piracy and the future of commerce.  Written from an insider’s perspective – Mason himself was once voted pirate of the year by Business Week – the book traces the development of various music genres over the decades and how they impacted societies. 

Defying the class action suits launched by record companies and copyright owners around the world, Mason declared that piracy isn’t a sin but instead, a necessary ingredient for innovation and invention. By allowing others to adapt and modify original content and spread it freely around, piracy helps to foster change in popular culture in all its forms – fashion, food, hairstyles, movies, games, software and even enterpreneurship.
Read More


How to be an Indispensable Linchpin

March 18th, 2011   •   no comments   

“You are not a faceless cog in the machinery of capitalism…” In fact, according to Seth Godin’s latest book Linchpin, you are an “artist who can give good gifts”. Best of all, you don’t need a canvas, a stage, nor a musical instrument to create art.

Beginning with such a delightful premise, Linchpin tackles the age-old issue of career motivation. What’s interesting is that Godin doesn’t just promote entrepreneurialism but rather, a form of intrapreneurialism – one where you as a worker in any circumstance or situation can “make magic”.
Read More


Citizen Marketers – A Book Review

February 15th, 2011   •   no comments   

Ben McConnell and Jackie Huba are stalwarts of the highly popular Church of the Customer blog and founders of Ant’s Eye View. Proponents of customer evangelism, community marketing and good old Word-Of-Mouth (WOM), McConnell and Huba’s book Citizen Marketers – When People Are the Message reads alot like their blog, using numerous examples and stories to drive home the point.

Against the omnipresent backdrop of social media (forums, blogs, podcasts, video streams, and social networks), Citizen Marketers focuses on four different groups of citizen marketers Filters, Fanatics, Facilitators, and Firecrackers:

Read More


Can You Make Money from FREE?

September 2nd, 2010   •   1 comment   

Well, apparently Chris Anderson, author of New York Times bestseller The Long Tail and editor-in-chief of WIRED magazine, seems to think so. Moreover, you can still make a decent living out of it.

In his book, FREE: The Future of a Radical Price (which you download completely for FREE though I have the paid paper version), Anderson shared that charging people $0.00 for goods and services can only be possible primarily through cross-subsidies. These could take the following routes:

Read More


The Promise and Peril of Starbucks

May 31st, 2010   •   2 comments   

Taylor Clark doesn’t like Starbucks. However, he does patronise its outlets. Apparently he is not alone, as there are many who publicly profess their distaste for Starbucks’ “almost burnt” brew while still swarming towards their outlet.

That in a nutshell is the premise behind the book “Starbucked” authored by Clark, a Portland-based journalist who appears to have more than a little caffeinated chip on his shoulder while appearing to be balanced in his authorship. Unlike the more glowing titles featuring the world’s most famous purveyor of coffee as experience, Clark squarely places both the pros and the cons of the cafe behemoth in his book.
Read More


Beyond Buzz by Lois Kelly (A Book Review)

April 12th, 2010   •   no comments   

What is the best way to make conversational marketing work?

How does one embrace the lofty ideals espoused by the Cluetrain Manifesto?

Read More


Making Money from Minority Markets

November 2nd, 2009   •   1 comment   


Courtesy of Christopher Pattberg

Considered one of the most multi-cultural country in the world, the United States of America has one of the world’s most culturally and ethnically diverse population. Presently, it has some 305 million people out of whom 68% are non-Hispanic whites, 15% are Hispanics, 12% are blacks and 5% Asian American.

While white Americans currently dominate the American marketplace, some of the country’s most profitable segments actually hail from the other segments. Projections by the Census Bureau show that by 2050 when the US population grows to about 439 million, non-Hispanic Caucasians will only make up 46% of the country’s population. By then, the population of Hispanics (the fastest growing group) will swell to 30%, with blacks growing to 15% and Asian Americans swelling to 9%.
Read More


Page 5 of 6« First...23456