Tag: consumer psychology

The Age of Antiheroes

May 1st, 2015   •   no comments   

The Age of Antiheroes - Hayao Miyazaki
Hayao Miyazaki’s movies are full of anti-heroes (courtesy of The Playlist)

Have you watched a Hayao Miyazaki movie like “Spirited Away”, “Howl’s Moving Castle” or “Princess Mononoke”?

If you did, you would have noticed something.

Miyazaki’s protagonists are anything but strong and heroic. On the contrary, they are often plagued by uncertainties, weaknesses and worries. However, we still love them! (Or at least I do)
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The 3 Illusions of the Social Media Age

April 23rd, 2015   •   1 comment   

Don’t let your eyes fool you (courtesy of Tech Whiz)

We’re living in an age of illusions. One where lives are built and destroyed by that perpetually glowing screen in front of us.

Love it or loathe it, the social web is here to stay. We spend so much time online that our entire socio-cultural landscape has shifted in immense and incredible ways. For some, being unplugged for even two hours can be unfathomably torturous.
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Why The Best Things In Life Aren’t FREE

May 1st, 2014   •   no comments   

Why the Best Things in Life Aren't Free

FREE. Its a powerful word. Everybody loves freebies.

Besides its a great way to attract customers right?
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The Zeigarnik Effect

March 27th, 2014   •   1 comment   

Russian psychologist/psychiatrist Bluma Zeigarnik (source of image)

What do video gamers, book worms and waiters taking multiple orders have in common?

Well, they usually remember what they have not completed until the task is done. And then, it literally gets wiped out of their system.
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Customer Sense: Book Review

July 10th, 2013   •   no comments   

Do you know that your five senses (sight, sound, scent, taste and touch) play a major role in what you buy?

While marketers go gaga over social technologies and their impact on digital commerce, it is often our physical perceptions of a product which influence buying decisions.
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How to Write for Your Audiences

October 27th, 2012   •   no comments   

Courtesy of NewGadget00

Consider the following two headlines:

“Optimise Your Basal Metabolism with Product X – The World’s Most Technologically Advanced Nutritional Supplement”

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The 7 Triggers of Fascination

July 11th, 2012   •   no comments   

Sally Hogshead of Fascinate (courtesy of Radical Careering)

I’ve listened to a fascinating podcast by Derek Halpern of the Social Triggers website. In the podcast, he interviews Sally Hogshead, the Chief Fascination Officer of Fascinate, Inc. and author of Fascinate: Your 7 Triggers to Persuasion and Captivation. Done in a conversational fashion, the interview provided an interesting overview of the 7 psychological triggers that companies can employ to achieve better and more targeted results in their marketing.

According to Sally (she blogs here) we don’t have learn how to be fascinating.¬† Instead, we should unlearn how to be boring!
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Predictably Irrational: A Book Review

May 29th, 2012   •   no comments   

Debunking conventional wisdom that human beings are rational and logical beings, Predictably Irrational by behavioural economist Dan Ariely provides an entertaining and enlightening read in the market-tested tradition of authors like Steven Levitt and Stephen Dubner (Freakonomics series), Malcolm Gladwell, and Ori and Ron Brafman (Sway). Using the results of empirical research conducted at MIT and other university campuses, Ariely explains why we do the things we do despite their contrary effects on our health, wealth and long-term success.

Written in a light-hearted, jargon-free prose, Predictably Irrational takes us through several themes. They include the fallacy of supply and demand (ie why pricing can be so arbitrary in certain markets), the overwhelming power of FREE, the danger of turning social norms into market norms (or why you shouldn’t pay your mother-in-law for cooking a delicious family dinner), the effects of expectations (what you visualise is what you get), and two chapters on honesty and dishonesty in humans, among others.

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Learning How We Make Decisions

April 4th, 2012   •   no comments   

Courtesy of Knowledge of the Day

I’ve just listened to a podcast by Derek Halpern of Social Triggers blog which presented a fascinating glimpse into the world of neuroscience and its impact on marketing. Interviewing Jonah Lehrer, author of “How We Decide”, the podcast explained that decisions are primarily made when there is an interplay between the stimuli that we receive and their influences on different portions of the brain.

Perhaps the most fundamental point is that emotions play a big impact on decision making. In studies where brain injury patients lose the use of their emotional brain centres (the limbic brain system), these individuals are often unable to make the simplest decision such as deciding where to have lunch and so on.

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