Tag: customer evangelism

Uprising: A Guide to Movement Marketing

February 2nd, 2016   •   no comments   

ImNoAngel Movement Marketing

I’m No Angel (#ImNoAngel) by Lane Bryant is a good example of Movement Marketing

In a “hyperconnected, ultra-competitive, and supercluttered marketplace”, doing more of the same big idea advertising on mostly mainstream media channels isn’t going to work anymore. Consumers are getting jaded and overloaded with information – much of which has little or no relevance to their lives nor their interests.

To win over increasingly cynical consumers who expects nothing less than total transparency (fueled by the openness of the social web), what should companies and businesses do?

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7 Ways to Delight Your Customers

February 19th, 2014   •   no comments   


Marketing is broken. At least in the traditional sense.

Focused on customer acquisition, promotions and sales volumes, traditional marketing views customers as “targets” to be arrowed.

Bigger, bolder and flashier campaigns are launched to attract their rapidly diminishing attention while carrots like discounts, freebies and lucky draws are dangled to coax them to open their wallets. 
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Face-to-Face Still Trumps Facebook

October 29th, 2011   •   4 comments   

According to the latest post on Church of the Customer, the most important platform for consumers to talk about brands isn’t on Facebook, Google +, Twitter or even SMS! Rather, it is good old person-to-person communication in the flesh (well at least in the US).

Have a look at this chart here from eMarketer:

Source: eMarketer.com
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Citizen Marketers – A Book Review

February 15th, 2011   •   no comments   

Ben McConnell and Jackie Huba are stalwarts of the highly popular Church of the Customer blog and founders of Ant’s Eye View. Proponents of customer evangelism, community marketing and good old Word-Of-Mouth (WOM), McConnell and Huba’s book Citizen Marketers – When People Are the Message reads alot like their blog, using numerous examples and stories to drive home the point.

Against the omnipresent backdrop of social media (forums, blogs, podcasts, video streams, and social networks), Citizen Marketers focuses on four different groups of citizen marketers Filters, Fanatics, Facilitators, and Firecrackers:

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Saying Sorry is Good for Business

August 22nd, 2008   •   2 comments   

Saying Sorry is Good for Business
Image courtesy of Billboard

“Sorry” may be the hottest hit by Justin Beiber on the charts today. However, it is still incredibly hard for companies to say.

And that has led to so many countless cases of organisational grief over the years.
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Do You Trust Someone Virtual or Real?

August 3rd, 2008   •   3 comments   

There is something which I always suspected about offline versus online Word Of Mouth (WOM) marketing. And that is that nothing beats the real thing.

While reading my favourite blog about WOM, which is the Church of the Customer, I came across these interesting statistics through its links. They hail from the US, the world’s most wired nation:

“Around 3.5 billion word of mouth conversations take place in the U.S. on a daily basis, of which just 7% take place online via instant/test messaging, chat rooms, email and blogs. The remainder take place offline either face to face (75%) or on the telephone (17%).”
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My Family’s Car Accident – A Tale of Service Excellence

October 7th, 2007   •   32 comments   

Yesterday afternoon, my wife together with my son and maid got into an accident along CTE (I was attending a work lunch then). What happened was a tale of God’s divine providence mixed with extraordinary service excellence.

My wife was driving towards the city and encountered the usual Saturday afternoon jam. Traffic was extremely heavy and crawling at a snail’s pace. Unfortunately, a slick black BMW driven by a young 19 year old guy crashed into the rear of our car. He must either be driving his dad’s car or distracted by his girlfriend.

The shock was so hard that the beamer’s airbag popped up. Fortunately, my family didn’t suffer major injuries although my maid had a swelling on her head (currently under observation) while my wife’s back hurt. Both cars stopped and my wife took down the driver’s full particulars (NRIC, license plate, hand phone photos of damage, insurance company, car model).
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Service versus Sales

August 13th, 2007   •   13 comments   

Used car salesman (courtesy of Chaka Raysor)

I am always puzzled why companies spend a lot more energy and focus on trying to sell rather than pleasing their customers. If you don’t already know, customer retention is a far more profitable strategy than customer acquisition. That, plus the fact that word of mouth is taking off more than ever in this ad-saturated age of increasingly powerful social networks. Here are some sobering statistics which tells you why you should pamper your existing customers rather than court new ones:

  • A typical dissatisfied customer will tell 6-10 people about the problem. A typical satisfied customer will tell 1-2 people.
  • It costs 6 times more to attract a new customer than it does to keep an old one.
  • Of those customers who quit, 68% do so because of an attitude of indifference by the company or a specific individual.
  • About 7 of 10 complaining customers will do business with you again if you resolve the complaint in their favor.
  • If you resolve a complaint on the spot, 95% of customers will do business with you again.

(Source: Customer Are Always)

Studies have also shown that a Customer’s Lifetime Value (CLV) can be far greater than that of a single transaction. In fact, 70% of a telco’s revenue comes from 30% of its customers: those who stay for years and purchase increasing levels of service. There is a nifty way to calculate CLV here.

Now shouldn’t you start paying more attention to those customers who made you who you are?

Why Are We Still Neglecting Word Of Mouth?

January 30th, 2007   •   8 comments   

Church of the Customer’s Ben McConnell pointed to this interesting bit of research by BIGresearch recently. Apparently, advertisers have been making all the wrong investments in mass media advertising when most people still relies on family and friends to give their recommendations on what to buy.

According to BIGresearch:

As more marketers seek to make media expenditures accountable to the bottom line growth of their company, the consumers in the survey don’t seem to be on the same page as advertising expenditures. When asked which media most influence their purchase decision for various product categories, consumers’ choices are rarely in line with advertisers expenditures.

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