Tag: web 2.0

Understanding Government 2.0

January 16th, 2011   •   1 comment   

A view of what Government 2.0 could be (courtesy of ZD Net)

What does Government 2.0 mean? Does it merely entail government agencies embracing the use of multiple social technologies and community platforms? Is it reflective of a more open, engaging and inclusive approach to governance? Or does it epitomise the beginning of active citizenry in all public affairs?

As I’ll be moderating a Gov 2.0 session on ‘Connection’ next week at Govcamp, I thought I should dig in deeper into this topic. For a start, here’s a definition of what Government 2.0 means according to Gartner
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Be a Participatory Citizen at GovCamp

January 7th, 2011   •   no comments   

Want to play a part in shaping how government can better serve you through social technologies? Got a burning desire to change the delivery of essential services? Why not participate in the first ever Singapore GovCamp?

Taking place on 19th Jan (Wed) on NUS Campus, Singapore GovCamp hopes to “connect the Government with the general public and private sector to communicate, collaborate and co-create government citizen services, improving and expanding citizen engagement and empowerment.” Its the first time that such a platform has been mooted so I guess it should be pretty interesting.
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Clay Shirky on The Future of Organisations

August 17th, 2009   •   1 comment   

Broad and sweeping, yet detailed and penetrating, Clay Shirky’s volume “Here Come’s Everybody: The Power of Organizing Without Organizations” is a tour de force of how technology influences group activity and organisation. Shirky skillfully blended social sciences like psychology, sociology and anthropology with elements of the social web – mailing lists, forums, blogs, Youtube, Flickr, MySpace, Facebook, Wikipedia and Twitter.

Weaving his words into an easily digestible narrative, Shirky isn’t afraid to borrow theories and concepts to back up his claims. A notable example is the Coasean Theory, which states that high transaction costs make hierarchical organisations more efficient than individuals striking agreements with each other. Shirky’s argument is that the lowering of coordination costs to practically zero through social tools like forums, emails, and blogs make it possible for new loosely structured groups to form outside traditional organisations. Hence the Coasean Floor of transactional costs are lowered, making it efficient and cost effective for such groups to form.
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Social Media in the World of Museums

April 25th, 2009   •   5 comments   

Clay Shirky speaks at the Smithsonian (courtesy of taoboy)

After several weeks of doing some online research/surfing/bumming around and asking friends (like the ultra intelligent Kevin Lim), I managed to get a handle (well partially) on what’s happening for social media in the museum world. Here’s what I found after some digging around:

First is the discovery of a blog aggregator for museums around the world called (surprise surprise) Museum Blogs! Believe it or not, there are now some 331 museums blogs (at least those which are captured here) around the world. I am glad to see that our dearly beloved Yesterday.sg is there too! Yay.
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Getting Past The Social Media Hype

March 3rd, 2008   •   8 comments   

Courtesy of butler.melvin

This article first appeared in Marketing magazine in February 2008. I thought it would be useful to share it with you here. And yes, I am back to blogging again after a super long hiatus!

By now, every publicist worth his or her salt would have heard of the wonders of new media. Anything imbued with the word 2.0, social media, conversational marketing, blogosphere or peer-to-peer is laden with the Midas touch. Want to access the 80 million blogs around the world?

Just put up something within the next two hours on Blogger, WordPress or Movable Type. Presto! Your blog ranking will hit Technorati’s top 100, and a gazillion citizen journalists will hungrily chew over every sacred word issued from your online altar, propelling you to instant worldwide fame.

Yeah right. If only it is this easy.

After dabbling in various social media platforms for close to three years, I learnt certain principles needed to thrive (or at least survive) in this space.

First, grow your grassroot groups by adopting a bottoms-up approach. A-list bloggers and blogeratis (blog celebrities) have huge readerships. However, are they the right target audiences for your corporate messages? It may be more prudent to cultivate your own niche community of raving fans who are users that endorse your products and services.

Second, do not fire your PR folks. While social media is largely dependent on the efforts of individuals in cultivating bloggers, there is still a huge role for mainstream media. Newspapers, TV, radio and magazines still capture a vast amount of eyeballs and audiences.

Third, be religiously regular in posting content but don’t kill yourself. The online race is a marathon – not a 100 metre sprint! If you are starting a blog, publish posts on a regular basis which your readers are comfortable with. If you are putting up podcasts, ensure that you are able to pipe in compelling content that listeners can appreciate and enjoy. Silence isn’t golden in cyberspace.

Fourth, establish yourself and your company as a thought leader. Blogging, podcasting or videocasting gives one an incredible opportunity to showcase intellectual prowess in the subject matter while gaining fans. Credibility is important so show your stripes in social media spaces.

Fifth, complement your online marcom strategies with offline ones. I am a firm believer that branding and integrated marketing communications should apply in the social media universe. Of course, it doesn’t mean that you have to slap your logo everywhere or embrace the same colour scheme throughout. What it does mean though is that your approach to engaging bloggers should be consistent with your brand values.

Sixth, get your hands dirty, roll up your sleeves, engage in online conversations and blog away. The best way to understand the new digital domain is to become one of them. Mingle freely way before delivering your first “key message”. It is back to Relationships 101 all over again.

Finally, be realistic about what you can or cannot achieve in the new media arena. There are certain topics and subjects that just won’t cut it online, regardless of the amount of cultivation/friendship/bribery that you have done. Be happy with little successes in the initial stages and build on to bigger and better things in time to come.

Lovin’ Those Trails

September 12th, 2007   •   7 comments   

At the recent IPRS Conference (PR 2.0) where I was invited to share as a panellist, I was inspired by Christopher Grave’s presentation which covered amongst other things the concept of “love trails”. These are paths off the beaten track created by folks to provide short-cuts from point A to point B.

As a runner and a frequent “trail blazer”, I found that this point resonated with me. It is somewhat similar to the idea of serendipity, where people choose to do what they do simply because they feel like it. Or the concept of tags in folksonomy.

What this means is that you shouldn’t box people into target segments by demographics, psychographics, GenX-GenY, and what have you. What this also means is that you let people choose how they prefer to interact with you and your organisation. If you are interesting enough, they will come to you, and find a way to get there.

As Frank Sinatra would have sung, “I did it MY WAY!”

From London With Love

August 30th, 2007   •   2 comments   

Came across this brilliant post by CEO of Saatchi & Saatchi Worldwide Kevin Roberts. Apparently, the Museum of London (yeah its a museum folks) is using Google Earth to create a Love Map of the city. According to Kevin,

“You register, locate a place on the map (like all Google-style maps it zooms in from a bird’s eye position to close-ups of houses and streets) and place a virtual pin on it. With your pin you get the opportunity to add a personal story connected with that place…”
Apparently, lots of people have already started populating the map with their personal tales of romance, kinship, historical encounters, and other recollections. In a way, this becomes a clever way of linking a place to the population. The end result is stronger community bonds and rootedness to a location, and of course more love.
Would be a great idea to do this in Singapore. In fact, we already have a champion for this area. Now, all it takes is to expand it to personal stories.

Are We Chasing Bright Shiny Objects?

July 21st, 2007   •   9 comments   

Read this brilliant post by Steve Rubel of Micro Persuasion fame. The main thrust of his post is that it still all boils down to understanding good old human behaviour as opposed to simply chasing the latest, greatest and coolest out there in the planet.

Quoting from him:

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The Exciting World of Social Media

June 21st, 2007   •   5 comments   

Podtech.net’s Jeremiah Owyang with The Digital Movement’s founder Steve Ng

At the recent iX-TDM New Media Forum, I had the privilege of meeting and hearing from Jeremiah Owyang. The director of corporate media strategy at Podtech.net, Jeremiah is a social media consultant to big guns like HP, Cisco and Hitachi. In his session, he spoke about trends and developments in the social media space.

Jeremiah started by explaining fundamental concepts. Companies need to shift their strategies and mindsets to look at harnessing all employees – not just corporate communicators (like yours truly… ha) – to be advocates.
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Blogout was a Blast!

May 24th, 2007   •   16 comments   

Blogging singer Genie sharing what tickles her fancy at Blogout

Just came back from Blogout which was a big social media bash at Geek Terminal attended by (who else) 2.0 geeks and celeb bloggers galore! The night was certainly interesting, with a veritable who’s who in the blogging scene making their appearances including Tomorrow.sg’s founder James Seng, STOMP’s editor Jennifer Lewis, Ping.sg’s creator Uzyn, Moblog’s originator Yoke Chin, Global Voices’ Preetam Rai, Kevin Lim of Theory Is The Reason and lots more members of the blogerati.

I certainly had fun moderating the panel discussion which talked about “A New Voice”, though it did go a little chaotic at times. My conclusion was that the crowd seemed to have more fun chatting with each other! Well, I guess that’s the spirit of the whole 2.0 movement, where EVERYBODY participates in the conversation. It’s “All Star Anything Goes” (for those old enough to remember that celebrity slugfest).

A special treat for the evening was having upcoming blogging singer Genie treating us to a music video of hers, hottest mummy contestant eastcoastlife sharing what makes her so special, and also hearing from celebrity STOMP blogger Joe Augustin. Nice to also know that we have upcoming technopreneurs in Singapore making their mark in the web 2.0 universe. Finally, it was great to meet Veron, DK and Dr Leslie Tay of I Eat I Shoot I Post fame, all big-time bloggers in their own right.

Special kudos go to Estee for the fabulous organising and professional emceeing of this event, as well as other digital movers like Ming Yeow, Su Yuen, Swathi, Chern Jie and all the other hardworking folks at The Digital Movement who made this possible.

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