Tag: attention economy

Does Sex-vertising Really Sell?

December 15th, 2011   •   2 comments   

Does sex-vertising really sell
Everybody talked about the shirtless Abercrombie & Fitch greeters in 2011 (Courtesy of A&F)

Let’s talk about sex in advertising – one of the longest running meme in the history of ads.

Time and time again, the topic has ignited heated discussion amongst marketers, manufacturers and moralists alike.

Does sex sell? Would a sexy ad have a better chance of grabbing the attention of one’s target audience? Or will it just be too “been there, done that” to have any effect?
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From Push to Pull to Participate

July 3rd, 2010   •   no comments   

T-Mobile’s Flash Mob at Trafalgar Square

In the world of advertising, it is common for one to think about generating Attention first before anything else.

After all, that age-old mnemonic AIDA (Attention, Interest, Desire, Action) is predicated on the ability to capture your target audience’s eyeballs/ eardrums in the cacophony of marketing clutter.
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Addressing the Absence of Attention

August 19th, 2009   •   1 comment   

I love this pie chart! (Courtesy of Creating Passionate Users)

One of the most prominent phenomena in this present age is its move towards slicing and dicing everything down to its simplest and most fundamental parts. This relish for reductionism has resulted in an ever increasing number of people who acquires information in a vast number of areas without ever dipping below the surface.

The latest I read was that mini-MBAs are now growing in popularity. Who has time to spend 1 or 2 years of their lives pursuing a fast ubiquitous qualification these days – other than the few oddballs like me?

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Why Britney Isn’t Retweeting Your Tweets

August 6th, 2009   •   2 comments   

Can you stand out in the crowded world of social media? (courtesy of Search Engine People)

As some of you may know, I am currently reading Clay Shirky’s interesting book “Here Comes Everybody” which examines the phenomenon of social behaviours and trends brought about by the onset of social networks and technologies. Several thoughts occurred to me, some triggered by Shirky’s ideas, many others not.

1) Social media doesn’t really replace traditional human behaviour, but provides new platforms and tools to manifest previously latent tendencies. Recent examples include the organising of meet-ups via forums, Facebook, or other social networking platforms, which caters to our urge to converge. We have always wanted to converse with our friends and family members – social media just makes it easier and more efficient to do so. Platforms like Youtube, Flickr and Odeo also caters to our interests like making home videos, taking photographs and composing our own music while sharing it with the world.
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Irreverence Or Irrelevance?

July 11th, 2009   •   no comments   

An extreme example of sex selling in NYC (courtesy of lickyoats)

The unassailable growth of consumer clutter has led to two things for marketers to consider.

The first is the need to conceive increasingly innovative and creative ways to attract attention. Most of which are so “In Your Face” that your senses have to be incredibly inured to ignore them. Witness how the outdoor advertising environment has blossomed significantly in the past few years, as well as the rise of online ads that not only pop up or pop under, but also animate themselves, generate annoying noises, and just plain irritate the hell out of you.
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Technopreneurial Tales

March 31st, 2007   •   2 comments   

Inspirational IT-preneurs sharing war stories

The final session at Nexus 2007 saw three eminent entrepreneurs in the technology field sharing their tales of passion, zeal and fervour in changing the world.

The three occupied very different tech niches. Farzad Naimi’s Litescape looked at integrating business applications, voice and data, allowing greater real-time collaboration on any device. Roberto Mariani’s XiD Technologies, on the other hand, was largely involved in face recognition and other biometric systems. And of course, crowd favourite Cory Ondrejka was one of the guys responsible for the hugely successful Second Life, a virtual world largely owned by its users.
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