Tag: consumer behaviours

Transcendental Marketing

June 3rd, 2014   •   no comments   

Transcendental Marketing
Can marketing scale Maslow’s pyramid to achieve transcendence? (courtesy of Prakash Advani)

What is the real purpose of your product or your brand?

Does it meet a customer need? Solve their greatest problem? Eliminate a nagging pain? Or help them to be more productive?
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The Ebb and Flow of the Social Web

March 12th, 2014   •   no comments   

Source of image

Catalysed by the ubiquitous social web, our lives are becoming inseparable from that of our networks. We are addicted to the constant online “strokes” delivered by our friends, and crave their likes, shares, comments and retweets.

Like it or loathe it, much of what happens in real life (IRL) is intimately intertwined to how we behave in the virtual world. And we’re lovin’ it.
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Mastering the Power of Habits

November 20th, 2013   •   no comments   

Mastering the Power of Habits

Courtesy of Bussolati

Good or bad, habits are hard to break. Try refraining from showering for a week – or even a day – to see what I mean!

As the old song by Chicago goes, habits can be hard to break. Especially addictive ones like smoking, binge drinking, or lazing on the couch.
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Buyology – Truth and Lies About Why We Buy

September 11th, 2013   •   3 comments   

Buyology - Truth and Lies About Why We Buy

Imagine that you are a smoker. You pick up a pack of cigarettes.

On the front of the pack are gory images – a hemorrhaged brain, blackened lungs, deformed baby, ugly cancerous growth – coupled with stern admonitions like “SMOKING KILLS”.

How would you react to these gruesome warnings?
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How Pleasure Works – Book Review

January 25th, 2013   •   no comments   

Why does pain sometimes feel like pleasure? Why do we enjoy music and art even though there aren’t any adaptive advantages? When does “one man’s meat” become “another man’s poison”?

The answers to these human behavioural puzzles (and more) can be found in How Pleasure Works. Written by Yale’s evolutionary psychologist Paul Bloom, the book uncovers the “new science of why we like what we like”. By delving into the fields of anthropology, evolution, history, biology and psychology, the book investigates why we humans are so different compared to our fellow earthlings. 
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Reaching the Consumer of the Future

May 18th, 2012   •   no comments   

What are some of the big issues facing the consumer of tomorrow? How should retailers, lifestyle businesses and fashion brands equip themselves to reach these customers?

Speaking at the recent Asia Fashion Summit, Ruth Marshall-Johnson, Senior Editor of Think Tank at WGSN, highlighted that consumer businesses need to consider five key trends and suggested how these should be addressed as follows:

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Learning How We Make Decisions

April 4th, 2012   •   no comments   

Courtesy of Knowledge of the Day

I’ve just listened to a podcast by Derek Halpern of Social Triggers blog which presented a fascinating glimpse into the world of neuroscience and its impact on marketing. Interviewing Jonah Lehrer, author of “How We Decide”, the podcast explained that decisions are primarily made when there is an interplay between the stimuli that we receive and their influences on different portions of the brain.

Perhaps the most fundamental point is that emotions play a big impact on decision making. In studies where brain injury patients lose the use of their emotional brain centres (the limbic brain system), these individuals are often unable to make the simplest decision such as deciding where to have lunch and so on.

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Three Ways to be Truly Great

January 11th, 2012   •   no comments   

Can you compete with the above brands on scale, distribution and price? (image source)

In the world of consumer businesses, there are probably three main ways to differentiate yourself from the hoi polloi.

The first way is to level your competition by beating them on price, variety, convenience, and distribution. And while you’re at it, look at meeting the lowest common denominators in consumer needs and wants. Huge consumer retailing outfits like Walmart, Target, 7-Eleven, Amazon and Carrefour are examples of companies adhering to this strategy, and so are major FMCG manufacturers like P&G, Unilever and Nestle.

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